Thompson Falls

Thompson Falls

Estimated Time: 1-1.5 hrs round-trip

Distance: 1.4 miles round-trip

Level: Easy

Thompson Falls makes for a scenic and easy destination in Pinkham Notch that is perfect for a quick afternoon hike. Plus, the swimming hole at the base of the falls is the perfect place to cool off on a hot summer day!

Parking for this hike is found at the base of Wildcat Ski Area. To reach the trailhead, cross over the bridge by the main lodge and turn left. Look for the signs for “The Way of the Wildcat” trail and “Thompson Falls”. The Way of the Wildcat trail is a short little nature loop with some great informative signs about the history of Pinkham Notch, the plants and animals found here, and the White Mountain National Forest so be sure to stop and read them as you go! About 0.1 miles along you will reach a split. If you are reading the signage, it is best to go to the left first. When you reach the far end of the loop continue straight ahead, following signs to Thompson Falls.

You will cross a small stream and then the old Route 16 (currently an access road for the ski area). Shortly after you will reach the base of the falls. From here, the trail continues up to the right a bit more steeply, crosses over the river and then continues up slightly more before ending at some flat rocks with more pools. If it is a clear day, there will be several nice views of Lion’s Head and Tuckerman Ravine on Mt. Washington. To return, simply retrace your steps.

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Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge

Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge is a beautiful place in Northern NH that has a fabulous range of habitats including bogs, ponds, and lowland spruce-fir forest. There are fun boardwalks to explore as well as multiple trails, some of which lead you to viewing platforms with excellent views of the Northern Presidentials.

The Refuge is managed by the NH Division of Forest and Lands. Ample information can be found on their website. You can also view the site map and guide here.

Cherry Pond in October  (photo by Dave Govatski for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)

Photo from NH Division of Forest and Lands

Lila’s Ledge

Estimated Time: 2-3 hours round-trip

Distance: 1.5 mile round-trip (longer with a loop through George’s Gorge

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

Lila’s Ledge is a great 1/2 day hike for families that is relatively easy and provides a great view of Pinkham Notch. Begin at the Pinkham Notch Visitor’s Center and take the Old Jackson Rd. Trail (OJR) from behind the Visitor’s Center by the bathroom. After approximately 0.3 miles you will cross over a large bridge. Immediately after is a small trail on the right called the Crew Cut Trail. Follow this trail for another 0.3 miles until you reach Liebeskind’s Loop. Turn left on Liebeskind’s Loop and almost immediately after a short spur trail to Lila’s Ledge will branch off on the right.

To return, you can either retrace your steps on the Crew Cut Trail, or try one of these two loop options:

1. OJR Loop – 2.3 Miles Total

After leaving Lila’s Ledge, turn right to continue on Liebeskind’s Loop. After about 0.5 miles you will intersect with the George’s Gorge Trail. Turn right and follow it 0.3 miles until you reach the Old Jackson Rd. Turn left and follow it 0.8 miles back to the Pinkham Notch Visitor’s Center.

2. George’s Gorge Loop – 2 Miles Total

After leaving Lila’s Ledge, turn right to continue on Liebeskind’s Loop. After about 0.5 miles you will intersect with the George’s Gorge Trail. Turn left and follow it for 0.5 miles down through George’s Gorge, and back to the Crew Cut Trail. Turn right on the Crew Cut Trail, which will lead you to the OJR where you initially turned off.

Note: George’s Gorge can be slightly more difficult hiking particularly when trails are wet and slippery.

Mt. Crag

Mt. Crag

Estimated Time: 2-3 hrs roundtrip

Distance: 2.2 – 2.8 miles roundtrip

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

Mt. Crag in Shelburne has one of the greatest rewards for effort ratios in the area. This relatively short loop not only follows a lovely trail through picturesque forest, it also leads to a fantastic rocky summit with great views of the Androscoggin Valley and the Northern Presidentials! The mountain can be hiked either in a loop (requiring a bit of road walking) or for a shorter option simply go out and back. For either option, begin on the eastern side by parking at the Austin Brook Trailhead.

The Austin Brook Trailhead is located on North Rd. in Shelburne (parking is across the st.) and is easily recognizable by the white fence and turnstile gate (yes, it has a turnstile!). The trail begins by following an old logging road that runs along the Austin Mill Brook. After 0.4 miles you will reach a 4-way junction. Turn left and take the Yellow Trail towards Mt. Crag. Shortly after the junction you will reach a group of giant boulders on the left that provide an excellent opportunity for poking around in small caves!

After the boulders the Yellow Trail begins to climb uphill through a deciduous forest. It switchbacks a couple of times before leveling off and emerging on the open summit of Mt. Crag. From the summit you can either reverse directions and head back the way you came, or continue on the Yellow Trail west towards the Gates Brook Trail. This side of the mountain is a bit steeper but is a nice contrast as it is largely a coniferous forest for most of the descent. It can be a bit more challenging, however, especially in wet weather.

After a short but steep downhill, you will reach the junction with the Gates Brook Trail, which continues to the right up towards Middle Mountain. To finish the Mt. Crag loop, turn left and follow the wide trail down to the road. After 0.5 miles, you will return to North Rd. and can walk along the pavement back towards the parking.

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Note: For added excitement, take a short detour to the Cable Car found on the Yellow Trail. It can be reached by turning right instead of left at the junction of the Yellow Trail and the Austin Brook Trail.

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Rattle River

The following write-up is for the Rattle River Trail in to the Rattle River Shelter. It does not cover the trail beyond the shelter.

Estimated Time: 2-3 hrs roundtrip

Distance: 3.4 miles roundtrip

Level: Easy

Directions to the Trailhead

The hike into the Rattle River Shelter makes for a lovely stroll in the woods. With only 500 ft of elevation gain between the trailhead and the shelter, the trail is very gradual. The trail also almost always stays near enough to hear and sometimes see the river, which makes it quite peaceful. It is a relatively easy trail to follow (when hiking into the shelter you are hiking south along the Appalachian Trail) with white blazes predominately marking the trees.

The shelter makes a great destination for a lunch, or on hot summer days, a swim in the nearby hole appropriately dubbed “Bigfoot’s Bathtub”. If you are feeling more adventurous, you can pack a tent and proper overnight equipment and spend the night at the shelter. There is an outhouse there as well.

Giant Falls

Giant Falls

Estimated Time: 2-3 hours round-trip

Distance: 2.4 miles round-trip

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

Giant Falls makes for a great half day hike on the seldom used Peabody Brook Trail. The trailhead is located on North Road in Shelburne about 1 mile down the road. Look for the white sign on the left and park on the dirt shoulder opposite. Be sure to not block anyone’s driveway when parking.

The beginning of the Peabody Brook Trail follows a wide flat path. Two or three times other paths branch off, but the white “Trail” signs are fairly obvious and easy to follow. Here the trail closely follows and once crosses the Peabody Brook, a very lovely stream and picturesque stream. About halfway to the falls an overgrown trail to Middle Mountain branches right and the Peabody Brook Trail continues straight ahead. Here the trail gets narrower and then soon climbs moderately with a large cliff on the right side and a steep slope down to the left.

Shortly after the top of the cliff the spur trail to Giant Falls leaves the Peabody Brook Trail on the left and descends slowly for approximately two-tenths of a mile until it rejoins Peabody Brook just before the base of Giant Falls. The entire waterfall is 350 ft tall, but only the bottom 110 ft are visible from the trail. Nevertheless, the view is remarkable and in the spring time would be quite the spectacle!

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Peboamauk Falls Hike

There are two routes in to Peboamauk Falls. The first is along the Ice Gulch Trail which begins on Randolph Hill Rd. The second is on the old Bog Dam Trail, which begins at the end of Jimtown Rd. The trail is no longer fully maintained but still very much passable as long as you are ok with mud.

Ice Gulch Trail 

Note: This trail description is only for the section of Ice Gulch Trail from Randolph Hill Rd. to Peboamauk Falls. For more information on the Ice Gulch Trail contact the Randolph Mountain Club or the Appalachian Mountain Club.

Estimated Time: 3-4 hrs roundrtip

Distance: 4.25 miles

Level: Moderate

This trail begins on Randolph Hill Rd. at an old farm marked Sky Meadows. You can park on the grass just opposite the farm (although parking in the winter may be challenging). To reach the trailhead, walk on the left side of the farm to the edge of the woods where you will see the trail.

The trail begins by descending slightly, then climbs and falls slightly over the next two miles as it crosses a logging road and three major streams. After two miles, the trail reaches a junction at “The Marked Birch”.

At the junction you will see two signs. One points to the left to the base of Ice Gulch. The other points back to Randolph Hill Rd. Despite the lack of signage, there is another option straight ahead that leads down to Peboamauk Falls. The trail is easy to follow, blazed in orange, and descends steeply for a short bit to the base of Peboamauk Falls.

For the quickest option, return the way you came by climbing back up out of Winters Home (the base of the falls) and continue straight back on the Ice Gulch Trail. If you want a longer option, you can follow the Peboamauk Loop to the top of the falls and then to the base of Ice Gulch.

The marked Birch

Bog Dam Trail

Estimated Time: 2-3 hrs roundtrip

Distance: 3 miles roundtrip

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

The Bog Dam Trail is no longer fully maintained, nor is it listed on current maps, but it seems that the bottom portion of the trail is maintained. At the end of Jimtown Rd. turn right and park in the lot on the left hand side just before the gate. In the back corner of the parking lot, you will see the beginning of the trail. After just a couple minutes, the trail meets up with the main path (alternatively you can access this by following the dirt road past the gate and getting on the trail over a berm on the left). Turn left at this junction and follow the trail uphill. It continues uphill, mostly in a straight path for about 1.25 miles. About a 1/4 of the way up, you will pass the Gorham dam far below you on the right. Intermittently you will get lovely views of the brook to your right.

Just before you reach the junction with the Ice Gulch Trail, there is an old, partially broken bridge crossing a small brook. Do not use this bridge, it is no longer safe. Instead, rock hop across the stream.

At the junction you will see two signs. One points almost straight ahead to the base of Ice Gulch. The other points left to Randolph Hill Rd. Despite the lack of signage, there is another option to the right that leads to Peboamauk Falls. The trail is easy to follow, blazed in orange, and descends steeply for a short bit to the base of Peboamauk Falls.

For the quickest option, return the way you came by climbing back up out of Winters Home (the base of the falls) and turn left back onto the Bog Dam Trail. If you want a longer option, you can follow the Peboamauk Loop to the top of the falls and then to the base of Ice Gulch.

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Mt. Crescent

Estimated Time: 3-4.5 hrs roundtrip

Distance: 3.4 miles roundtrip

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

Mt. Crescent makes an excellent destination for those looking for a slightly more difficult half day hike. With over 1200 feet of elevation gain in 1.7 miles, Mt. Crescent ranks as one of the more difficult “Moderate Hikes” reviewed on this website. That being said, it is still a great choice for kids who have some experience hiking and offers wonderful views.

Recently a new parking lot was made for Mt. Crescent. It is much larger than the previous one, and cuts off a bit of the trail. To get there, simply follow Randolph Hill Rd. all the way to the end. There is plenty of parking and the lot is plowed all year round. The Mt. Crescent Trail is marked with orange blazes and leaves the parking lot from the northwest corner where it crosses the logging road and heads in to the forest.

Right from the beginning the trail starts to climb up. After a little ways it reaches a junction with the Cook Path on the right and then continues to the left to the junction with the Castle View Loop. Here you can take a short detour to Castle View Rock, which can be found by following the signs down a spur trail from the main Castle View Loop Trail. Castle View Rock is a large boulder that can be climbed on for views of the Northern Presidentials. For younger children or those seeking a shorter hike, this can make for a nice destination and can even be turned into a loop by following the Castle View Loop over to the Carlton Notch Trail.

After the junction with the Castle View Loop, the Mt. Crescent Trail levels out slightly as it travels through a more open patch of forest. It then climbs briefly before reaching the junction with the Crescent Ridge Trail. Both the Crescent Ridge Trail and the Mt. Crescent Trail lead to the summit of Mt. Crescent, which is 0.6 miles from this junction. The Mt. Crescent Trail is slightly more challenging as it climbs over some slabby ledges just before reaching the summit. The Crescent Ridge Trail wraps around the mountain to the east, before climbing somewhat steeply to the summit. The trails can be combined to make a loop, in which case going up the Mt. Crescent Trail and down the Crescent Ridge Trail would be preferable.

While the summit of Mt. Crescent is somewhat unremarkable, there are excellent views both north towards the Kilkenny Range and south towards Mt. Madison, Mt. Adams, and Mt. Jefferson. Both view points are clearly marked with signage.

Pine Mountain

Pine Mountain

Estimated Time: 2 – 3 hrs

Distance: 3.5 miles for entire loop

Level: Moderate

Directions to the Trailhead

The summit of Pine Mountain and the ledges on the south side are home to some of the best views of the Northern Presidentials. There are two ways to reach the peak. The longer route uses the Pine Mountain Trail and leaves from near the center of Gorham. This route is shorter and requires less elevation gain and leaves from Pinkham B Road, just across from the Pine Link Trailhead. There is parking available for free at the trailhead.

The hike begins just opposite the parking area and for the first 0.9 miles follows the Pine Mountain Road – a private dirt road that gives access to the Horton Center. After 0.9 miles the Ledge Trail branches to the right. It passes under a big cliff and then climbs fairly steeply for a short ways to the top of the cliff. It is from this point that there are excellent views across Pinkham Notch and to the mountains in the south.

From the ledge the trail continues more gradually to the summit of Pine Mountain where you will find the Horton Center. On the summit you can reconnect with the Pine Mountain Road and follow this back down to the parking area.

Taking in the fall foliage from the ledges on Pine Mtn.

Taking in the fall foliage from the ledges on Pine Mtn.

The Waterfall Loop

The Waterfall Loop

Estimated Time: 1-2 hours

Distance: 1.5 miles roundtrip

Level: Easy

Directions to the Trailhead

The Waterfall Loop is an excellent hike for beginners or anyone looking for a scenic stroll in the woods all year long! In the summertime there are numerous pools that make for wonderful swimming. In the spring the falls will rush with the snow melt from the mountain summits. In the winter the frozen water and snow creates a magical environment, where you can see animal tracks crossing the brook and holes where the flowing water is still visible. And in the fall leaves in the water will add color to the brook bed!

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Swaterfall loop5tart from the Appalachia trailhead on Rt. 2 in Randolph. There are many trails leaving from this trailhead, but they are all clearly marked. Look for signs for the Fallsway Trail. After you leave the parking lot, there is a short patch of forest followed by the Rail Trail and power lines. After the power lines you will reenter the hardwood forest following the yellow blazed Fallsway Trail and will soon meet up with Snyder Brook. From here the trail stays on the west side of the brook and continues uphill passing by 3 set of waterfalls – Gordon Falls, Salroc Falls, and lastly Tama Falls. As you hike up hill you will pass by many excellent pools and flat rocks perfect for swimming and picnicking! Relax, cool off, and enjoy the mossy banks of Snyder Brook.
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Just before Tama Falls, the Valley Way Trail briefly joins the Fallsway Trail. Continue to follow signs for the Fallsway Trail/Fallsway Loop and you will soon reach Tama Falls, 0.7 miles from the parking lot. Just above Tama Falls you can cross over Snyder Brook on some flat rocks and head down the other side of the brook via the Brookbank Trail. Enjoy the falls from a different perspective and be sure to check out the very large flat rock about halfway down! At the bottom you will reach the power lines. Here you can either cross back over Snyder Brook to rejoin the Fallsway Trail or look for a small path just to your right that continues downhill to the Rail Trail. If you choose the 2nd option, you will meet the Rail Trail just to the right of a large bridge. Turn left, cross the bridge, and follow the trail back to the parking lot.waterfall loop2